Bus vs. Scooter

This incident has happened on May 9th, 2013 at the Broadway and Cambie st. intersection. The driver of a scooter was attempting a left turn on the yellow light, while the Translink’s 99 B-Line bus was trying to make it through. Luckily, nobody got seriously hurt (as it seems), and the driver of the scooter got immediate help from the good Samaritans.

Apparently, the guy made it to the front page of the today’s The Province issue, with several bruises and totalled $2000 scooter (well, at least his new GoPro is okay).

Now, our favourite Insurance Corporation of British Columbia, or ICBC, will be determining who is to blame. Judging by the newspaper article, if they figure that the bus was beating early amber, ICBC would cover all the damages to the driver of the scooter; otherwise if they arbitrate he made a turn on the yellow light, he will have to bear it out of his pocket (I am unclear on whether the bus has to be paid for or not).

The scooter guy says he has sent the video to the VPD and will be filing a complaint. He said he has also filed a claim with ICBC and reported the incident to TransLink. It sucks for the guy, but he had to make sure that oncoming vehicles came to the full stop before proceeding with his turn. ICBC left turn accidents page describes the vehicles involved in such accidents.

Section 128(1)(a) of the Motor Vehicle Act is the “yellow light provision” and it states that “[w]hen a yellow light alone is exhibited at an intersection by a traffic control signal, following the exhibition of a green light… the driver of a vehicle approaching the intersection and facing the yellow light must cause it to stop before entering the [intersection] unless the stop cannot be made in safety…”.

Section 129(1) of the Motor Vehicle Act is the “red light provision” and it states that “when a red light alone is exhibited at an intersection by a traffic control signal, the driver of a vehicle approaching the intersection and facing the red light must cause it to stop before entering the [intersection]”.

The combined effect of sections 128(1)(a) and 129(1) is that a driver is permitted to enter an intersection on a yellow light if it is not possible to stop safely, but is never permitted to enter an intersection on a red light: when traveling at a reasonable speed it should be possible to stop within the full cycle time of a yellow light.

TL;DR:

Can two physical objects occupy a single space at the same time? Nope.
Also not smart to try to beat a Translink bus

– ctcsupplies

Comments

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